The Martingale Roulette System




Although the house always has an advantage no matter what type of wager a player make, roulette connoisseurs have over the years tried to come up with systems to beat the casino.

Roulette Wheel

Many of these betting systems involve wagers giving even-money payout; odd-even, high-low and black-red, and the most famous is called the Martingale System.

How does the Martingale System Work?

The system is designed for wagers that have 50 % chance of winning, for example a coin toss or a black-red bet in roulette (because of the green slots on a roulette wheel the chance of winning is actually 47.37 % and not 50 %.)

The basic idea of the Martingale Roulette System is that a player doubles his bet after every lost wager. If the first bet is $5 on red, and the ball lands in a black or green pocket, the player then bets $10. If the next spin also has the wrong outcome, the player doubles the bet again. This continues until the player wins.

When the player wins, he will have gained the amount of his first wager. Let's say the player first lost $5 and then lost $10, but won when he bet $20. His total wagers are $35, but his winnings are $40 (including the bets) - in other words, a profit of $5.

This might seem to be a waterproof system - and it is - under certain conditions:

The player must have (almost) unlimited funds, because in the long run, there will be abnormal streaks. Say that a player starts his Martingale session with a $5 wager and loses 10 bets in a row. He must then bet $5,120 to make a $5 profit. Obviously this won't happen that often, but when it does, the player must have a large bankroll.

Unfortunately, most casinos have a max-bet limit, so a player can't double the bets as many times as he wants. Say that the max bet is $1,000. A player who starts a Martingale session with betting $5 is in deep trouble if he looses the 8th bet ($640). He is not allowed to double the last lost wager and the system is ruined.

Conclusion

The Martingale System is the perfect betting system (if the player has an unlimited bankroll and the casino doesn't have a betting limit.)

Is that the case for you?

No, it probably isn’t. In fact, that’s not the case for any gambler.

For most players, the Martingale works perfectly for a while. You’ll lose, say, three four spins in a row and then make up for that loss on the next spin. You do it over and over again and life feels great.

But if you’ll use this system for a while, you’ll eventually run into 10, 15 losses in a row. Now you have a huge loss on your hands – probably a lot more than you’ve made from your several small wins before.

So Martingale works - in theory - but you should never use it.

 

If you're looking to have a few spins of the Roulette wheel, visit our Games Section and if you want to head over to a casino and try the system out, visit our Casinos Section to find an online casino to play at.